Denmark’s SSI recommends changes to syringe injection method for #coronavirus vaccines

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“Usually one does not need to aspirate before injecting a vaccine. However, in the context of investigating a possible association between injection of covid-19 vaccine from AstraZeneca and the occurrence of rare but severe cases of blood clots and bleeding, SSI recommends, for the time being, on a precautionary principle, to aspirate before administration. This applies to all the approved covid-19 vaccines, both for injection into the deltoid muscle, but also for the alternative option of injection into the vastus lateralis muscle, if injection into the deltoid muscle is not possible.”

SSI new vaccination recommendations

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Update from Berlingske.dk

After problems with blood clots: Statens Serum Institut recommends new vaccine technology

Several Danish doctors have expressed concern that a widespread technique may have been one of the reasons why several people around Europe have developed fatal blood clots after being injected with the corona vaccine from AstraZeneca.

Corona vaccines must be injected into the muscle, intramuscularly as it is called. And to make sure that the needle has not hit a blood vessel instead, it is now recommended that you pull the plunger back a little to see if blood is included. If this happens, you must insert again before injecting the vaccine.

Usually it is not necessary to withdraw the plunger to give a vaccine, writes SSI, but so far it is the newly recommended method. The Danish Health and Medicines Authority has long recommended the same method.

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