Raging spread of #coronavirus infection at a school in Umeå, Sweden

The spread of infection is rampant at the Prolympia School in Umeå. 24 students and 3 teachers have so far been found infected.

It has broken loose in a completely different way than it has done before, says the school’s principal Rasmus Wengberg.

It is suspected that it is the British mutation of the virus that has affected the school, because so many have fallen ill, despite precautionary measures.

svt.se report

 

 Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

Number of Swedish #coronavirus ICU patients has increased sharply in last 2 days #Sweden

A total of 240 covid-19 patients are in intensive care wards around the country, compared to only 197 ten days ago. The number of coronavirus patients who are cared for in regular wards has also increased.

Of the country’s 21 regions, 13 report an upward trend in the number of patients on IVA (ICU).  Västerbotten currently has the most IVA patients per capita, with 13 inpatient IVA patients, followed by Norrbotten, Jönköping and the Västra Götaland region.

Dagens Nyheter report

 

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Anders Tegnell: Rapid spread of the British mutation B.1.1.7 #B117 in Sweden

According to state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell, the spread of infection is increasing on a broad front in the country. In recent weeks, there has been a clear upward curve. Stockholm is worst affected by the regions.

The new virus mutations, mainly the British mutation, are taking up more and more space in society. Authorities have only detected a limited spread of the Brazilian and South African mutations in the country.

The British variant has increased at a very fast pace. There is a little difference between different regions, but not that big, says Anders Tegnell.

At the same time, the number of patients admitted to IVA (ICU) has decreased since December, but according to Tegnell, there is a risk that the number may soon increase.

svt.se report

 

Image by Sini-Meri Iivari from Pixabay

A tiger and 2 lions infected with #SARSCoV2 in #Sweden

On [13 Jan 2021], The National Veterinary Institute (SVA) confirmed SARS-CoV-2 in a tiger held in a Zoo in Sweden. Samples from the same animal were simultaneously sent to IDEXX laboratories, Germany, where SARS-CoV-2 also was confirmed [14 Jan 2021].

Whole-genome sequencing at the SVA showed that the virus belongs to the global lineage B1.177.21.

Necropsy was performed at the SVA on [16 Jan 2021]. Macroscopical lesions of the respiratory tract were mild and unspecific. Convincing signs of pneumonia were not seen. Some blood-tinged mucus was present in the lower part of the trachea and bronchi. Findings in other organs were preliminary considered to be age related and thus probably not related to SARS-CoV-2. Results from histological examinations are pending.

The tiger was a 17-year-old female, which was euthanised [11 Jan 2021] for animal welfare reasons due to severe respiratory and neurological symptoms, high age, and low possibilities for recovery. The symptoms started with loss of appetite [9 Jan 2021], but rapidly worsened [11 Jan 2021] in the morning and the animal was euthanised and sampled the same morning. A male tiger kept in the same enclosure as the female has shown moderate respiratory symptoms, but no neurological symptoms.

A group of lions, consisting of 2 adults and 2 subadults, kept in the same house, have also shown mild respiratory symptoms but no neurological symptoms and are otherwise clinically unaffected with normal appetite. Fecal samples from the lions, received at a later date, were also confirmed positive for SARS-CoV-2.

Staff taking care of these groups of animals also had symptoms: one of the sick persons tested positive for SARS-CoV-2/Covid-19, while 3 more are awaiting their results.

#Sweden bans entry from #Norway following #B117 outbreak in #Oslo

Sweden will soon introduce an entry ban from Norway to reduce the risk of the spread of infection. The message comes from Mikael Damberg after the outbreak of the British mutation in the Oslo area. According to Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, the border will be closed at midnight, the night before Monday.

https://www.dn.se/varlden/hard-nedstangning-av-oslo-efter-brittisk-smitta/

 

 
Image by Alexandra von Gutthenbach-Lindau from Pixabay

#Sweden’s #coronavirus strategy slammed by government inquiry

“The strategy to protect the elderly has failed”, writes [Sweden’s] Corona Commission. And thus rejects the whole of Sweden’s strategy.”

“Sweden’s corona strategy was established at an early stage: Allow some spread of infection and protect the risk groups – especially the elderly. It has long been clear that it has not worked and on Tuesday the message came in black and white.

The strategy to protect the elderly has failed,” the Corona Commission wrote in an interim report, emphasizing that the single most important factor behind the high death rates in elderly care is probably the general spread of infection in society.”

https://www.dn.se/ledare/en-hard-dom-over-den-svenska-coronastrategin/

Image by Frankie Fouganthin – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=89297851

60 million confirmed #coronavirus infections globally, and the rate is still increasing

There have now been more than 60,000,000 confirmed coronavirus infections globally and the infection rate is still increasing.

https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/

National #coronavirus lockdown in Sweden from 13th December

The national restrictions in Sweden will, in the first instance, apply to the Christmas and New Year holidays. After that, it is very possible that there will be a return to local measures, according to Anders Tegnell.

– We think that it has worked well with the local measures, but just over the weekend we have a need for coherence in the country.

On Monday, the government presented a proposal to limit public gatherings to a maximum of eight people. The proposal is expected to be hammered out already on Thursday and will be valid for four weeks from 24 November. This means that the majority of Sweden’s population has to comply with national recommendations, local measures and statutory restrictions.

https://www.dn.se/sverige/rikstackande-atgarder-planeras-infor-julen/

 

Image by Ioannis Ioannidis from Pixabay

#Sweden relied on ‘wishful thinking’ to handle #coronavirus and got it wrong on herd immunity

Sweden was left unprepared for a second wave of coronavirus because of ‘wishful thinking’ by its top virus expert, his predecessor has said.

Annika Linde, Sweden’s state epidemiologist until 2013, said Anders Tegnell got it wrong when he predicted that herd immunity built up over the summer would protect the country when winter came.

That approach has seen cases and deaths soar, and on Monday forced Prime Minister Stefan Lofven to announce that gatherings would be limited to a maximum of eight people.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8953315/Coronavirus-Sweden-Wishful-thinking-left-country-exposed-second-wave.html

 

 

Image by Ioannis Ioannidis from Pixabay

The Swedish Public Health Agency is investigating about 150 cases of #coronavirus #reinfection

The Swedish Public Health Agency is currently investigating about 150 cases of coronavirus reinfection.

A 53-year-old woman from Malmo who was reported reinfected in August 2020 had a noticeable clinical infection the second time she was infected, with fever, difficulty breathing, ant crawls in the body and lost her sense of smell.

https://www.dn.se/sthlm/150-aterinsjuknade-utreds-lakaren-andreas-smittades-tva-ganger/

 

Image by Joseph Mucira from Pixabay

#Coronavirus particles found in hospital ventilation system

The coronavirus particles were found in the ventilation system at Uppsala University Hospital, including on the top floor of the building, far away from Covid-19 wards, a study shows.

During the pandemic, droplet transmission has been considered the most significant transmission route for Covid-19.

The findings suggest airborne infection may be a greater risk than previously thought, Erik Salaneck, researcher and infectious disease doctor at the University Hospital tells Swedish Radio.

Image by Alexander Stein from Pixabay